About Us

Beaver Cemetery
A Fitting Tribute

Since the Civil War, people have chosen Beaver Cemetery as a final resting place for their loved ones. Here amid the beauty of stately trees sits an area landmark with winding roads and intriguing monuments standing in tribute to the persons who contributed to the history and destiny of this area. Centrally located, Beaver Cemetery is surrounded by a wall that separates this quiet peaceful setting from urban surroundings, and designates it as a special place set aside for peaceful repose. Here lives are remembered and their passage honored in quiet dignity.

Careful planting of trees over the years and constant upkeep ensures that this proper historical setting will be retained with all its beauty. Every year the seasonal changes add to the dramatic beauty of the cemetery, which is enhanced each spring by the bright colors of family plantings and veterans’ flags waving.

A Tradition of Caring

Founded in 1865 by community leaders to provide an area for dignified and proper burial. A trust fund was soon established to ensure maintenance of the Cemetery into perpetuity. Beaver Cemetery is one of the oldest ongoing institutions in Beaver County.

Here amid the beauty of stately trees sits a community landmark with winding roads and intriguing monuments standing in memory of the persons who contributed to the history and destiny of Beaver County. Centrally located, Beaver Cemetery is surrounded by a wall that separates this peaceful setting from the town and allows it to be a special place set aside for quiet repose. Here lives are remembered and their passage honored in quiet dignity.

Careful planting of trees over the years and constant upkeep ensures that this historical setting will be preserved with all its splendor. Every year the seasonal changes add to the dramatic beauty of The Cemetery. Bright colors are enhanced each spring by families plantings and Veterans’ flags waving. The Cemetery is recognized by the Beaver County Veteran’s Office as one of the best maintained cemeteries in our area.

Nonprofit-Non Sectarian

The Beaver Cemetery is governed by a voluntary board of trustees. As a nonprofit organization all income generated by the Cemetery is used to meet operational costs, to make improvements, and to provide perpetual care for centuries to come. As a nonsectarian facility, Beaver Cemetery is open to all who choose to take advantage of its historical beauty and tradition of caring.

A Variety of Burial Choices

Beaver Cemetery has expanded over the years to its current size of 46 acres. The sections that were laid out and conceptualized as part of the original cemetery design are referred to as "Old"sections. The “New” section is complete with irrigation, ambient lighting, and extensive landscaping including more than 100 trees. It features a columbarium for cremation urn remains and a beautiful Cremation Garden, where upright memorials are encouraged.

Over 2,000 additional cemetery and private crypt lots are available.

Our mausoleum which is heated and air conditioned offers above ground burial choices of crypts, niches and family areas. The Chapel provides an appropriate and serene place for services and quiet meditation. Private mausoleums within the cemetery grounds are permitted.

Prearrangement, A Thoughtful Decision

Making prearrangements is a shared and thoughtful decision, and it relieves the family members of making decisions under stressful conditions. The courteous staff of Beaver Cemetery will help you with your decisions concerning the burial alternatives and selections available. A copy of a Free Personal Planning Guide is available in our office. Click here to view!

When A Death Occurs

The staff at Beaver Cemetery will work closely with families and funeral directors to fully share options and services of The Cemetery. We will ensure your comfort with your choices of a final resting place for your loved one.

Community History

The area’s most celebrated leaders, business pioneers and architects of our civic institutions now rest eternally in Beaver Cemetery.

These are a select few in terms of their historical nature.Matthew Stanley Quay arrived in Beaver in 1840. The son of a Presbyterian minister, Quay graduated from Jefferson College -- now Washington & Jefferson College -- in 1850. A lawyer by trade, he was admitted to the bar in 1854 and served several terms as county prothonotary by his 28th birthday.

In 1861, Quay enlisted in the Union Army, earning the rank of colonel. He was awarded theMedal of Honor for his heroism at the Battle of Fredericksburg, then becoming the personal assistant to Pennsylvania Gov. Andrew Curtin. Upon returning to Beaver, he became the editor of two local newspapers while situating himself in politics. His list of political accolades includes terms as state treasurer, secretary of the commonwealth and, finally, two terms as a U.S.senator.

Quay was a friend and confidant of famous writer Rudyard Kipling and of President BenjaminHarrison, who credited Quay’s political acumen with leading him to electoral victory in 1888.

Quay lived most of his life in Beaver and died on May 28, 1904. His funeral made headlines in every major city and drew thousands of people from around the nation to Beaver.

Col. James P. Leaf and his wife, Nellie N. Leaf are considered by many to be one of the founding fathers of Rochester. Leaf was a civil engineer who presided over numerous public projects in the county. He served three terms on Rochester Council and was also elected twice as a Beaver County commissioner.

Upon America’s entry into World War I in 1917, Leaf served as a major in the 52nd RegimentEngineers. Despite being 52 years old at the time, he demanded to serve his country. Leaf died in 1950.

Chief Justice Daniel Agnew devoted much of his life to the advancement of Beaver County.

Agnew came to Beaver in 1829, setting up a law practice. He presided over many of the early legal battles in the area and earned the title of president judge for four counties in 1851. In 1863, Agnew was elected to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. After a decade of honorable service, he was elevated to chief justice of that court and spent six years in that capacity.

Agnew helped craft much of the early telling of Beaver County’s history, writing and speaking on the subject throughout his life. He died in 1902 at the age of 94, one of the most respected and beloved officials in Pennsylvania.

The Saints at Rest Book: A Do-It-Yourself Walking tour of Historically Significant Gravesite in the Beaver Cemetery is available in the Cemetery Office for a donation of $5.00

So They Have A Place To Go

A place of reflection and relaxation… joggers taking advantage of the cemetery’s wide walking paths or families enjoying a stroll among the beautiful shade trees.

Find a Grave

Here you find details about Beaver Cemetery and individual memorials for many people buried here. Memorials generally include birth, death and burial information and may include pictures, biographies, family information and more. Currently, there are over 24,000 memorials listed.

Learn more